Wet weather negatively affects CCSD garden

10:00 am | September 12, 2013

With the expectation of a disappointing yield for the Carter County Sheriff’s Department garden this year, officials are saying they still have room to grow.

Photo by Brandon Hicks Nearly all the Roma tomatoes planted in the CCSD garden experienced blight.

Photo by Brandon Hicks
Nearly all the Roma tomatoes planted in the CCSD garden experienced blight.

Currently unsure about the total yield this year, John Huber, who is the Carter County Detention Center’s lead inmate work supervisor, said he expects the garden, which is in its third year, to have generated less produce compared to previous years.

He said wet weather over the summer has negatively impacted the whole garden, but some crops were affected more than others.

“It affected everything,” Huber said. “Every other day it was saturated with downpours.”

Tomatoes experienced extreme blight, Huber said.

“Before they got ready to pick, they turned sour,” he said. “They were almost sitting in water all the time. All over Carter County, you can talk to anyone, and they’ll say they didn’t get any tomatoes this year.”

Nearly all of the cabbage planted was no good, but corn, beans and potatoes were plentiful.

“We were a little bit behind this season the whole time,” Huber said. “This year we were trying to get a bigger quantity of fewer crops.”

Carter County inmates helped officers plant corn, cabbage, Roma tomatoes, squash, beans and potatoes on a combined total of about two acres of land located on Sycamore Shoals Drive.

In addition to the main garden, another plot of land, which is where potatoes and cabbage were grown this year, is located beside the construction site for the new Elizabethton/Carter County Animal Shelter.

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