Parks & Rec board swinging for fences with batting cages proposal

10:00 am | April 11, 2013

Around this time of year, when Little Leagues, schools, and the MLB are getting into full swing, it’s not uncommon for people to catch baseball fever.

Photo by Max HrendaParks and Recreation Board Member J.R. Campbell suggests finding vacant plots of land in the county that could handle the installation of batting cages. Campbell said the cages should be in a visible area that could be easily accessed by the public.

Photo by Max Hrenda
Parks and Recreation Board Member J.R. Campbell suggests finding vacant plots of land in the county that could handle the installation of batting cages. Campbell said the cages should be in a visible area that could be easily accessed by the public.

Not even the county’s Parks and Recreation Board.

On Tuesday afternoon, the board continued its discussion on the placement of batting cages in the county, and agreed to give funds to a local school to complete work on its ball park.

During the board’s March meeting, County Commissioner Buford Peters, who serves as the county’s liaison to the board, suggested installing batting cages on a vacant lot east of U.S. Highway 19E, south of the Doe River. The county owns the property, and has sought to find a use for it for several years.

After some discussion, however, the board decided that the lot would be unable to sustain both the cages and the necessary parking space.

“If we don’t have a place to park, I don’t know what we’re going to do,” Peters said.

Board members agreed that, even if the batting cages were not placed on the county property, they could still prove to be a good source of revenue — and fun. Board member J.R. Campbell suggested searching for a piece of property that could be easily seen, and accessed, by the public.

“We need a visible place where people can go by and see other people having fun,” Campbell said.

More than the potential for revenue, Campbell said the fun factor may ultimately prove to be more important for the county’s residents.

“If we never made a penny, it would pay for itself through the enjoyment of it,” Campbell said. “I want a flat piece of land where kids could just come and play ball.”

Campbell then advised board members to keep a watchful eye for any vacant lots that could be used for the cages.

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