Meth-y business: Road crews assist in locating hazardous drug labs

11:00 am | November 12, 2013

Although stories of the Carter County Sheriff’s Department disposing of suspected methamphetamine labs are becoming somewhat common, the manner in which they find them is becoming more diverse.

Photo by Brandon HicksOn Nov. 6, an inmate work crew from the Northeast Correctional Complex in Roan Mountain discovered this bottle, which contained compounds used in making methamphetamine. Sheriff's Department Capt. Mike Little said the department has been more active in teaching its work crew supervisors how to recognize remnants of drug labs.

Photo by Brandon Hicks
On Nov. 6, an inmate work crew from the Northeast Correctional Complex in Roan Mountain discovered this bottle, which contained residue of methamphetamine. Sheriff’s Department Capt. Mike Little said the department has been more active in teaching its work crew supervisors how to recognize remnants of drug labs.

On Monday afternoon, Sheriff Chris Mathes, sheriff’s deputies and agents with the Tennessee Meth Task Force spent approximately three hours disposing of remnants of a mobile methamphetamine lab found on the side of the road in the vicinity of the 100 block of Sneed Hill Road.

But the lab wasn’t discovered by an officer, nor by a member of the public. Rather, it was found by members of the Sheriff’s Department inmate work crew.

“They were cleaning up a large trash dump, and through the process, noticed a bag they felt had some suspicious contents,” said Capt. Mike Little, who assisted with Monday’s cleanup. “The inmates alerted their supervisor, and he, fortunately, had been through training.”

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