Living: With the Elephant Walk

10:13 am | November 8, 2012

It is about the time of the year for the big parades.

When Thanksgiving arrives many people will be ready to watch the spectacular parades in the large cities introducing the holiday season. The inflated animals and other characters get larger every year. Celebrities and bands from many parts of the country add to the excitement. The popular song says, “I love a parade …,” and that is true for most of us.

We line up for the Christmas parade in our home town and enjoy the local bands and groups that parade down the street. The small town parade has an appeal that excites us because the band includes our children, and we recognize the people in the cars and on the floats.

We wait patiently for the arrival of Santa Claus and his candy. One would think that we had paraded enough, but then come the football games and the bowl parades. Who can match the beautiful flowers on the floats at the Rose Bowl Parade? Throughout the New Year that follows, there will be others. The song is right, “I (We) love a parade!”

I think the home town parade is still my favorite, but there is one that has always been special for me. Maybe it is because it was seen through my eyes when I was a child. Sometimes childhood memories grow bigger as the years pass.

I still remember when the circus came to town with all its excitement. I didn’t usually get to see the big show under the tent, but I was standing on the curb when the circus parade marched up main street. It had samples of the big event. There were blaring horns and the large organ mounted on a wagon. I do not remember the tunes it played but it was noisy. On another wagon was a cage with a lion or a tiger.

Of course, there were clowns and other circus participants, but the most exciting part of the parade for me was the elephant walk. Last in line came the elephants. Each one reached out with his trunk and held the tail of the one in front. To me they looked like moving mountains, but they seemed content with the noisy crowd. The circus still comes to town, but it is different in the big coliseum.

There was another parade approaching the city of Jerusalem many years ago.

In the church we call it the “triumphant entry.” There was only one animal, the colt of a donkey. Twelve men called disciples followed along. There were no musical instruments, but there were the voices of crowds of people who were crying out praises to the one riding on the colt. They had placed clothing on the colt and spread it on the road while waving branches in the air.

This parade was for King Jesus! It may not have been as spectacular as today’s events, but it had the most important person who ever lived, the King of Kings and Lord of Lords.

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