Egg Fight champion shines at crunch time

10:00 am | April 2, 2013

Torrential rains and frigid temperatures were no deterrents for the hard-boiled combatants at Sunday’s Peters Hollow Egg Fight, where thousands of eggs cracked under the strain of competition.

Photo by Brandon HicksHannah Colbaugh celebrates after her win over Michael Scott in the adult division of the Peters Hollow Egg Fight. This marked Colbaugh’s second victory in the competition, with her first coming in 2011.

Photo by Brandon Hicks
Hannah Colbaugh celebrates after her win over Michael Scott in the adult division of the Peters Hollow Egg Fight. This marked Colbaugh’s second victory in the competition, with her first coming in 2011.

Dozens of Easter Sunday participants helped celebrate the fight’s 190th year, which began as a competition between the farmers of Peters Hollow and Rome Hollow to test the quality of their products.

Since both sides of the egg are used in each mini-battle that makes up the fight, and 30 adults, each with 72 eggs, competed, then, there could have been as many as 4,319 egg fights before a winner was named.

As it turned out, only 4,306 were needed.

After nearly three hours of competition, Hannah Colbaugh was proclaimed champion, with more than a dozen eggs unused.

“I felt pretty good going in to the end,” Colbaugh said. “I wasn’t sure for a while, but when I saw that everyone else didn’t have as many, I felt pretty decent.”

While the egg fight can seem like a game of chance, there is no shortage of repeat champions. This year’s win marked Colbaugh’s second time hoisting the trophy; she previously won in 2011.

The egg fight has four divisions, each with a limit on the number of eggs a combatant can use. Each scramble begins when one combatant holds his or her egg to the right and keeps it steady, in a sort of “defensive” position. The other combatant, to the right, then taps his or her egg against the other to see which cracks first. The first to crack then flips the egg over and the process repeats itself.

Though the event has come to include store-bought eggs as well, Norman Peters, who has hosted the event for nearly 20 years, said the custom is more important than the agriculture.

“It’s just a tradition here in the Hollow,” Norman Peters said. “A lot of people come from different places to participate. It’s a good time.”

Elizabethton Star back open navigation

Switch to our desktop site